Journalist Al Cross speaks at CU’s Media Appreciation Luncheon

Journalist Al Cross speaks at CU’s Media Appreciation Luncheon

March 30, 2015
For Immediate Release


Al Cross, director of the institute for rural journalism and community issues at the University of Kentucky, was the guest speaker at Campbellsville University's Media Appreciation Luncheon on March 19. He spoke to mass communication students and fellow media about seeking truth above entertainment. (Campbellsville University Photo by Drew Tucker)

 

By Josh Christian, student news writer

 
Dr. John Chowning, vice president for
church and external relations and executive
assistant to the Campbellsville University
president, welcomed everyone and
introduced Al Cross as the guest speaker.
(Campbellsville University Photo by
Rachel DeCoursey)

CAMPBELLSVILLE, Ky. – “Seek truth and report. Minimize harm to your subjects and sources. Act independently, and be accountable and transparent to the people you serve,” Al Cross, director of the institute for rural journalism and community issues at the University of Kentucky, said to mass communication students and fellow media at Campbellsville University’s Media Appreciation Luncheon on March 19, quoting the Society of Professional Journalist’s Code of Ethics.

Cross urged all media to seek truth in the age where media seeks entertainment.

“Never has it been easier to lie outrageously and get away with it,” he said, from an article Charles Pierce wrote in Esquire Magazine.

Cross’s presentation emphasized the problem of media as well as the progression of media as a whole. Cross began with the newspaper and its domination of the media.

“Newspapers were the only real form of mass communication,” he said.

However, as the years went on, newspapers began to be dominated by political interests.

 
Stan McKinney, lead professor of Mass
Communication, gave an update on what
changes have been made and will be made
to the CU program. (Campbellsville
University Photo by Kyle Perkins)

“It wasn’t until the 1800s newspapers evolved from partisan promotion sheets into mass-circulation publications that were based more on fact than opinion,” Cross said.

He explained the evolvement of mass communication as the Internet became public and computers became faster. Additionally, cable was changed with the advent of satellites, creating a wide variety of sources.

“Journalism has become an industry,” Cross said.

Cross closed with encouraging students to pursue media as a public service rather than a way to become a star.

This was Campbellsville University’s 11th Annual Media Appreciation Luncheon. The Office of University Communication, along with the CU Department of Mass Communication, plans the luncheon to thank the media for their work with the university and for mass communication students to connect with media.

Photo from the event can be found on CU's Flickr page.

Campbellsville University is a widely acclaimed Kentucky-based Christian university with more than 3,500 students offering 63 undergraduate options, 17 master’s degrees, five postgraduate areas and eight pre-professional programs. The website for complete information is campbellsville.edu.

 
Dr. Keith Spears, vice president for graduate
and professional studies, announced that
WLCU-TV will go digital in May 2015,
expanding into thousands of homes.
(Campbellsville University Photo by Drew
Tucker)


 


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Campbellsville University's Media Appreciation Luncheon was hosted by the Office of CU Communications. From left: Drew Tucker, communications assistant; Kyle Perkins; Joan C. McKinney, news and publications coordinator; Shelby Hall; Jilly Benningfield; Hanna Hall; Al Cross, director of the institute for rural journalism and community issues at the University of Kentucky; Kasey Rickets; Samantha Clark; Jordan Snider; Josh Christian; and Linda Waggener, marketing and media relations coordinator. (Campbellsville University Photo by Stan McKinney)