Science rules the day for over 40 students from four counties at CU's Clay Hill Memorial Forest

Science rules the day for over 40 students from four counties at CU's Clay Hill Memorial Forest


Nov. 6, 2014
For Immediate Release


Lebanon Middle School visitors at Clay Hill Memorial Forest last week included: Cheryl May (teacher), Jenya Loughney, Morgan Garrett, Wesley Dye, Tanner Barker, Elissa Turpin, Mason Sullivan, Victoria Coon, Alysson Coffman, Emallee Isabelle, Alanna Colvin, Cameron Cox, Austin Robbins, Cheyanne Raikes, Zoe Price, Tristian Magana, William Spalding. (Campbellsville University Photo by Joshua Williams)

By Linda Waggener, marketing and media relations coordinator

CAMPBELLSVILLE, Ky. – High school and middle school students from four Kentucky counties attended the first field day of the semester at Campbellsville University’s Clay Hill Memorial Forest (CHMF), a regional center for environmental education and research, Oct. 21.

Taylor County High School teacher Sue Dillery, advancement placement biology and environmental science, has been coming to CHMF for 12 years. She said, "It is a springboard for further research and gives an appreciation for nature, both aesthetic and history."


Green County High School visitors at Clay Hill Memorial Forest last week included: Ms. Melissa Bright, Austin Matney, Logan Westmoreland, Drue Hodges, Nicholas Russell, Drew Collison, Majestee Hughes, Allie Sidebottom, and Mrs. Laura Bishop Cash. (Campbellsville University Photo by Joshua Williams)

This was the first of four workshops of the 2014-15 academic year and was conducted by Andrea Drayer, a biologist from the University of Kentucky Department of Forestry. She engaged students in learning about amphibians and reptiles.

 

Dr. Gordon Weddle talks with Amy Berry,
Campbellsville University’s new environmental
educator and instructor of environmental science
who is taking part in operations at CHMF.
(Campbellsville University Photo by Joshua
Williams)


The four one-day workshops, funded by Kentucky Utilities, are designed for middle and/or high school students.

"This outreach will bring science to life for the participating students and teachers," said Dr. Gordon Weddle, Director of CHMF and professor in the CU Division of Natural Science. "I can think of no more formative experience for a student than to spend a day with a professional scientist in the field doing science." He shared that one of the high school students in attendance declared it the best day of school he’d ever had.


Green County High School visitors at Clay Hill Memorial Forest last week included: Ms. Melissa Bright, Austin Matney, Logan Westmoreland, Drue Hodges, Nicholas Russell, Drew Collison, Majestee Hughes, Allie Sidebottom, and Mrs. Laura Bishop Cash. (Campbellsville University Photo by Joshua Williams)

Weddle said, "It is potentially a formative experience for participating students in their effort to choose a career and our hope is that by exposing these kids to actual field based experiences with professionals they will have their horizons broadened and go on to college and science based professions.

Amy Berry, Campbellsville University’s new environmental educator at CHMF and instructor of environmental science on campus, said, “I am excited to be working alongside Dr. Weddle and being a part of this newest program at Clay Hill, exposing middle and high school students to experts in a science field doing actual hands on work. Working with a few select students who have a strong interest in science and providing a situation that may influence continued study beyond high school and career choice is very rewarding.”


Taylor County High School visitors at Clay Hill Memorial Forest last week included teacher Sue Dillery, Belinda Cheng, Carolyn Bast, Jacob Ferrante, Abby Spurling, Will Cox, Tori Daugherty, Nathan Mink, Amelia Newton and Rebekah Cowherd. (Campbellsville University Photo by Joshua Williams)

Berry has a master’s in Environmental Education from Merry Lea Environmental Learning Center Goshen College in Indiana and came to CU from Louisville where she worked for various agencies as an educator, including 4-H, the Louisville NatureCenter and Jefferson Memorial Forest.

The next workshop is on 18 November at CHMF. Zeb Weese will lead on bat biology and conservation. He is a biologist who works for the Kentucky Heritage Conservation Land Fund of the Kentucky Natural Resource Department.

 
The colorful Kentucky Corn Snake poses while his
holder, Campbellsville University student Joshua
Williams, makes a selfie with his iPhone to send
home to India. The other hands are those of Andrea
Drayer, a biologist from the University of Kentucky
Department of Forestry who engaged students in
learning about amphibians and reptiles.
(Campbellsville University Photo by Linda
Waggener)

Pictures from the Oct. 21 event can be found at CU's Flickr gallery.

For information on the three upcoming workshops in November, April and May, phone (270) 465-9570 or email staff@clayhillforest.org. The website for more information is www.clayhillforest.org.

Campbellsville University is a widely acclaimed Kentucky-based Christian university with over 3,500 students offering 63 undergraduate programs, 17 master’s degrees and five postgraduate areas. The website for complete information is campbellsville.edu.

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