CU and ECTC announce educational partnership

CU and ECTC announce educational partnership


Dan Flanagan, at left, a member of Kentucky’s Council on Postsecondary Education, Dr. Michael V. Carter, president of CU, Dr. Thelma White, president and chief executive officer of ECTC, the Rev. Dr. B.T. Bishop, pastor of First Baptist Church in Elizabethtown, and the Rev. John Chowning, vice president for church and external relations and executive assistant to the president at CU, were on hand to show support for the educational partnership. (Campbellsville University photo by Joan C. McKinney)

April 1, 2010
For Immediate Release

Campbellsville University and Elizabethtown Community & Technical College announce educational partnership

By Joan C. McKinney, news and publications coordinator

CAMPBELLSVILLE, Ky. – Campbellsville University and Elizabethtown Community & Technical College signed partnership agreements March 31 that will allow students from ECTC to have a “smooth and seamless” transfer to CU to obtain degrees in four areas.

Dr. Michael V. Carter, president of Campbellsville University, and Dr. Thelma White, president and chief executive officer of ECTC, signed agreements offering ECTC students opportunities to obtain bachelor degrees from CU in business administration, criminal justice, interdisciplinary early childhood education and organizational management.

ECTC graduates, with a two year associate degree in these four areas, may transfer those hours to Campbellsville University in pursuit of a bachelor's degree.

The presidents signed the agreements in CU’s new Brockman Center in Hodgenville as students from both institutions observed.


Dr. Michael V. Carter, right, president of Campbellsville University, and Dr. Thelma White, president and chief executive officer of Elizabethtown Community & Technical College, sign memoranda of agreement between their two institutions that will allow ECTC students to transfer credits to CU and obtain four bachelor degrees. Students watching the signing were: from left, Jessica Haire of Elizabethtown, a student at ECTC; and CU students Brooke Cooper of Russell Springs, Ky., and Amanda Adkins Powers of Hodgenville. (Campbellsville University Photo by Joan C. McKinney)

Carter said the programs will help “strengthen lives of individuals to become better people.” He said the cooperative partnership with ECTC will help people “reach their dreams and achieve their goals.”

He said the programs will work in a way to enrich lives, and the partnership will work to set a model for Kentucky.

“We need to go beyond our borders to serve people,” Carter said. “We are extremely excited about the partnership with ECTC.”

White said education is a “necessity,” and she said the students at ECTC have an “excellent track record for successful two-year graduates.”

“We are here to serve the community so any student who wishes to gain an education may do so,” she said. “We are here to do the right thing for the people of the Commonwealth.”

“We want to create a smooth and seamless transfer of our students to Campbellsville University. We want to continue to be good neighbors and strong partners and set the bar high for everyone,” she said.

Dan Flanagan of Campbellsville, a member of Kentucky’s Council on Postsecondary Education, attended the signing and said the partnership between CU and ECTC “pleases” the Council.

He said the agreement provides “service to people and serves goals” and “makes possible opportunities for people to further themselves.”

LaRue County Judge/Executive Tommy Turner, who is a member of the Campbellsville University Board of Trustees, said education is the “most important subject to be engaged in.”

He said “this means a great deal to our community and our future.”


Dr. Keith Spears, vice president for regional and professional education at CU, interviews LaRue County High School principal Paul Mullins at Campbellsville University’s Brockman Center in Hodgenville, discussing the importance of the educational partnership between CU and ECTC. Videotaping the interview is Jeannie Clark, TV-4 technician specialist at CU. (Campbellsville University photo by Joan C. McKinney)

Hodgenville Mayor Terry Cruse, a product of ECTC, opened City Hall to CU when the university needed a place to hold classes before the Brockman Center was ready for occupancy. He said city staff members have already taken classes at the Brockman Center, and he said he appreciates the new union with CU and ECTC.

Dr. Keith Spears, CU vice president for regional and professional education, was the master of ceremonies for the event. He said years from now the signing of the partnership will be a moment to be looked back on to “see how these two great institutions work together.”

The Rev. Dr. B.T. Bishop, pastor of First Baptist Church in Elizabethtown, gave the invocation for the signing event.

Nearly 7,000 students are enrolled at ECTC, and the college offers associate degrees, certificates and diplomas in 33 academic and technical programs. ECTC awards more than 2,100 credentials each year.

CU enrolls over 3,000 students and offers 44 programs at the undergraduate level, 15 master’s programs and four post-graduate programs.

More information can be obtained at 1-800-264-6014 at CU and at 1-877-246-2322 at ECTC.

Campbellsville University is a private, comprehensive institution located in South Central Kentucky. Founded in 1906, Campbellsville University is affiliated with the Kentucky Baptist Convention and has an enrollment of 3,006 students who represent 97 Kentucky counties, 30 states and 37 foreign nations. Listed in U.S.News & World Report’s 2010 “America’s Best Colleges,” CU is ranked 23rd in “Best Baccalaureate Colleges” in the South, tied for fifth in “most international students” and fourth in “up-and-coming” schools in baccalaureate colleges in the South. CU has been ranked 17 consecutive years with U.S.News & World Report. The university has also been named to America’s Best Christian Colleges® and to G.I. Jobs magazine as a Military Friendly School. Campbellsville University is located 82 miles southwest of Lexington, Ky., and 80 miles southeast of Louisville, Ky. Dr. Michael V. Carter is in his 11th year as president.